Social Media Trends and Predictions for 2015

By on February 26, 2015

How will the remainder of 2015 pan out in terms of social media?

The future is anyone’s guess, of course – but it’s often instructive to look ahead, even when it’s impossible to say for sure what’s in store.

It was maybe not exactly unexpected, but social media has seen a continued uplift over the past year: mobile use has reached its ‘singularity’ and, for the first time, has exceeded desktop use. One of the knock-on effects of this is that the top tier of social networks continue to thrive, with facebook continuing its dominance as the most popular social media destination. Hence why – as this article discusses – social media strategy remains crucial for media and brands , and why innovation remains king.

However, things that may seem permanent today may in fact be more temporary than most of us realize, so what are the likely emerging trends of 2015 in social media?

Here are some of my predictions:

Facebook makes evolutionary leap

The accepted wisdom is that Facebook has reached some kind of saturation point, that everybody who wants to be on it is on it, and, well, end of story. But it’s been occurring to me for a long time that Facebook could potentially provide engagement opportunities that we haven’t considered in the past.

Let’s look at it like this. You go on Facebook, you post a status update, give some friends’ comments a Like, and maybe click on a few links to various pieces of content. But sooner or later that’s your particular Facebook window over – as you get distracted, or snap your phone shut and go do something else. I use the term ‘snap your phone shut’ metaphorically, of course. Nobody uses a clam shell style phone these days, do they?

Essentially what happens each time someone leaves the site is that an opportunity to keep them there has been lost. Why have people go off to Spotify, Netflix, YouTube channels, television catch-up services (and so on), when you could keep them there, right within your site?

I’m not going to make any bold claims as to the specifics of what Facebook might introduce to the site. All I’m gonna say is that – for me, at least – there’s a content vacuum in there somewhere that would fill up nicely – and seamlessly – with the rest of Facebook if it was presented in just the right way.

Big changes for Twitter?

As an avid social media user, I often find myself wondering – what could I change about this-or-that networking site if I was able to?

In Twitter’s case, the answer has to be ‘not much’. It has long since lost its original, slightly Spartan design. And it has gotten busier, bigger and (mostly) better as time has passed.
But maybe Twitter’s success is causing problems. I always like the way that Twitter has a kind of DIY feel – it’s up to you to follow or unfollow users in different information areas to craft the feed that you want to see – you get to choose the exact mix of friends, relations, news sites and so on. Unlike Facebook – whose feeds are processed by its Edgerank system – there is no filter for your Twitter feed. All well and good when it was a young network. But as we amass more followers – and become the followers of more and more other users, the feed gets bigger and longer.

As some have already pointed out, it must be a concern for the network that some users might be suffering from informational overload.

Which begs the question: does it get to a theoretical point where a filter becomes necessary for Twitter to make sense? With an ever-increasing amount of noise out there, it is, some would surmise, inevitable.

I don’t see Twitter going ‘algorithmic’ any time soon though – and my guess is that when changes are made, they will not ape Edgerank. Instead, I’d expect to see something that is (perhaps) optional, for instance, and designed more or less completely around topicality, relevancy and up-to-the-second freshness.

In summary

Now that Facebook and Twitter are on the stock exchange, it means that the revenue stream will be increasingly important. This isn’t necessarily going to mean that the services they offer will change that much – but it does mean that any change will need to be something that is to their millions of users’ liking.

In short, both of these social networks are in a ‘good place’ right now – and it will be interesting to watch them develop over the coming months. Will we see great change? Will pretenders to the crown appear out of stage-left darkness to steal the limelight? Watch that space!

About Ian McCartney

Ian McCartney is a digital marketer for the Equator agency in Scotland, UK.
  • http://thenpn.com/at/63610 Milany Quinto

    for me its always be a facebook gained more audience so if we post on fb we always can get more traffic.

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